Best Hiking Boots

In this guide, we’re going to discuss the ins-and-outs of hiking boots and provide you with what we think are the best hiking boots on Amazon. By the end of this guide, you’ll be ready to lace up and head out on your next big adventure.
ProductGenderProduct name Buy Now
boot-1webMen'sMerrell Moab 2check-price-here-blue-web
boot-2webMensSalomon X Ultra 3check-price-here-blue-web
boot-3webMen'sVasque Talus UltraDrycheck-price-here-blue-web
boot-4webWomen'sMerrell Moab 2check-price-here-blue-web
boot-5webWomen'sClorts Hiking Bootscheck-price-here-blue-web
boot-6webWomen'sKeen Koven Mid Hiking bootscheck-price-here-blue-web

Hiking boots will make or break your experience on the trail. If they’re too small, you risk injuring your toenails and getting blisters, and if they’re too big, it’s easier to trip over rocks and roots. You also have to ensure your boots won’t cause hot spots and whether or not they will provide support on long-distance hikes.

In this guide, we’re going to discuss the ins-and-outs of hiking boots and provide you with what we think are the best hiking boots on Amazon. By the end of this guide, you’ll be ready to lace up and head out on your next big adventure.

Hiking Boot Types

Just like trekking poles and sunglasses, there are a variety of types of hiking boots, and it can be hard to know which one is right for you.

Day Hiking Boots

Day hiking boots are low-cut, have flexible midsoles and are for shorter distance hikes. Of course you don’t need to have a different pair of boots for every adventure, but day hiking boots provide little support and aren’t built for heavy loads.

Middle Distance or Midweight Hiking Boots

Mid distance hiking shoes are perfect for hikers who go on longer day hikes or short backpacking trips. They don’t require much break-in time, and they’ll provide you with the support you need to venture deeper into the backcountry. While midweight boots are a bit stiffer than day hiking shoes or trail runners, they are still flexible and don’t feel like they will weigh you down. We’ve included mostly midweight options in this guide.

Backpacking, Long Distance or Heavyweight Hiking Boots 

When people think of hiking boots, the image of heavyweight hiking boots most likely come to mind. Long distance hiking boots are high cut to provide you with the most ankle support to ensure you don’t buckle under the weight of you backpack on long treks. With all of that support comes a heavier boot with stiffer midsoles for support on and off trail.

Trail Runners

Trail runners aren’t technically hiking boots, but they are becoming a popular option for day hikers and ultralight backpackers. Due to their lightweight, you can move faster in trail runners, and they also dry faster than traditional hiking boots. Like hiking boots, trail runners come in a variety of weights, fits, and types, so we won’t be covering them in this guide.

How Should Your Boots Fit?

Hiking boots should fit snug but not tight, and you should have enough room to allow for swelling. If you’re buying boots online, it can be hard to know exactly what size to get. We’ve made sure to only include option in this guide that can easily be returned.

If you prefer insoles or orthotics, make sure you have them with you when you try your new boots on. Socks are also an important factor to consider when making sure your new hiking boots fit. Wearing socks you already own will help you determine if your boots are a good fit. It’s also helpful to wear the socks you intend to wear when hiking.

Hiking Boot Materials

In this guide, you’ll see terms like: upper, midsoles, outsoles, and internal support. Each of these components are made up of a variety of materials that impact the functionality of hiking boots.

Hiking Boot Uppers

Uppers impact a boots weight, breathability, durability and water resistance. Uppers can be made of leather, synthetic leather, waterproof membranes, like Gore-Tex® or eVent®, insulation and even vegan materials.

Hiking Boot Midsoles

Midsoles provide comfort and support and buffers feet from shock. Midsoles are what determine if a boot is more flexible or stiff.The most common midsole materials are EVA (ethylene vinyl acetate) and polyurethane.

Internal Support

Hiking boot internal support is made up of plates and shanks. Shanks are 3-5 millimeter thick inserts placed between your boots midsole and outsole. They add load bearing thickness to your boots. Plates are placed below the shank, and they provide protection bruises caused by impact from roots and uneven rocks.

Hiking Boot Outsoles

All hiking boot outsoles are made of rubber. Some outsoles feature added materials like carbon to increase their durability. Outsoles also have lugs and heel brakes. Lugs are the grooves in the bottom of the outsole. Backpacking hiking boots have deeper and thicker lugs to improve grip. Heel brakes reduce your chance of sliding during deep descents.

You might be wondering how we determined which hiking boots are the “best” available on Amazon. When sifting through the pages of results, we considered the following factors: cost, shipping, and reviews.

In terms of shipping, all of the items listed below are eligible for Prime 2-day shipping. Last but not least, customer reviews. We filtered our results based on reviews with four stars and up, and from there, we didn’t select any hiking poles with less than 50 reviews. While product reviews are always subjective, it’s important to us that we recommend items that have been tried and true by a variety of hikers in a variety of places.

All of the boots below are great options for hikers of all skill levels, and we’ve provided three options for men and three options for women.

Men’s

Merrell Men’s Moab 2

 

Material: Suede Leather and Mesh Upper

Features: The Merrell Moab 2 is a middleweight waterproof hiking boot with a closed-cell foam tongue that keeps moisture and debris out. It features a blended EVA contoured footbed with zonal arch and heel support as well as a rubber toe cap to ensure maximum comfort on any terrain. The suede leather and mesh upper make the Moab 2 both durable and breathable, and an air cushion in the heel that absorbs shock and adds stability. 

Salomon Men’s X Ultra 3 Mid GTX Hiking Boot

Material: Leather, EVA Midsoles

Features: The Salomon X Ultra 3 hiking boots feature a Gore-Tex® waterproof liner that let your feet breathe while protecting them from the elements. These boots are sculpted to hole your feet in place. The soft textile linings wick moisture away from your feet, and the tongue gussets block debris. There are mudguards and rubber to caps to provide protection from roots and rocks, and Salomon’s signature design of strategically placed lines on the outsoles are intended to increase the boots’ flexibility.

Vasque Men’s Talus Trek Ultradry Hiking Boot

Material: Leather and Mesh Uppers Synthetic Sole

Features: The Vasque Talus UltraDry Hiking Boot features nubuck leather and abrasion-resistant mesh that shaves weight. The UltraDry liner ensures that your feet will stay dry no matter what. These boots have a thick, cushioned collar around your ankles to provide optimum support and comfort, and at 20 oz., the Vasque Talus UltraDry boot is light but mighty and receives praise for its durability.

Women’s

Merrell Women’s Moab 2 Mid Waterproof Hiking Boot

Material: Suede Leather and Mesh Upper

Features: Similar to their male counterparts, the Merrell Moab 2 is a middleweight waterproof hiking boot with a closed-cell foam tongue that keeps moisture and debris out. It features a blended EVA contoured footbed with zonal arch and heel support as well as a rubber toe cap to ensure maximum comfort on any terrain. Cushioned ankle support means that breaking these in will be a breeze and that your weight will be supported no matter how far you travel. The suede leather and mesh upper make the Moab 2 both durable and breathable, and an air cushion in the heel that absorbs shock and adds stability. 

Clorts Women’s Hiking Boots 

Material: Suede and Leather Upper, Synthetic Sole

Features: An Amazon exclusive and a more budget friendly option at under $100, Clorts Hiking Boots have all of the bells and whistles without breaking the bank. Clorts are water resistant and air permeable to keep you dry and cool while on trail. The padded collar and tongue ensure a supportive and snug fit without being too tight. Clorts have an EVA midsole that cushions your foot and provides stability on rough terrain. The rubber outsole features deep lugs for traction and enhances your grip on wet surfaces.

KEEN Women’s Koven Mid Hiking Boot

Material: Leather Upper, Synthetic Sole

Features: Keen Koven Mid Hiking boots are made of a waterproof and breathable membrane to seal out water and keep your feet dry. Keen boots have impeccable attention to detail and feature pull tabs on the tongue and heel making them quick and easy to pull on. The compression molded EVA foam midsoles provide arch support and comfort for any distance. The Keen Koven hiking boot is perfect for any and all terrains, and a great “entry level” hiking boot for outdoors enthusiasts.

Hiking boots are the most important piece of hiking gear you will purchase, and not all boots are created equal. Your experience will depend on how comfortable your feet are on trail, and while it’s easy to find hiking boots, the challenge lies in finding the right hiking boot. 

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